The New York Times: Review: ‘Blindspotting’ walks a tense line in a gentrifying Oakland

The opening credits of “Blindspotting” showcase the city of Oakland, Calif., in split-screen, offering two distinctive points of view. One side shows a vibrant multiracial culture living in a frequently beleaguered environment; the other a gentrifying city whose newest residents — young, white, start-up-happy, new-money types — seem eager to embrace the area’s “authenticity,” as long as their interactions with its longtime residents don’t involve any real discomfort.

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The Wall Street Journal: Wells Fargo reaches $2.09 billion settlement over mortgage-backed securities

The Wall Street Journal, : Wells Fargo reaches $2.09 billion settlement over mortgage-backed securities Wells Fargo. agreed to pay $2.09 billion to settle with the Justice Department over the sale of toxic mortgage-backed securities during the financial crisis. The Justice Department said Wednesday it reached a civil settlement with Wells Fargo to end the long-running probe […]

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Next City: Raising the bar for local economic impact of affordable housing

With its office about two and a half miles away in another part of Brooklyn, Williams’ JW Electric Corp. is a certified minority-owned subcontractor hired to set up the building’s electricity. The firm got $5.1 million in subcontracts for CAMBA Gardens II, its largest contract since Williams founded the business in 2002. The project employed up to 25 of his workers — most of them Brooklyn residents.

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The New York Times: How the suffrage movement betrayed black women

Historians who are not inclined to hero worship — including Elsa Barkley Brown, Lori Ginzberg and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn — have recently provided an unsparing portrait of this once-neglected period. Stripped of her halo, Stanton, the campaign’s principal philosopher, is exposed as a classic liberal racist who embraced fairness in the abstract while publicly enunciating bigoted views of African-American men, whom she characterized as “Sambos” and incipient rapists in the period just after the war. The suffrage struggle itself took on a similar flavor, acquiescing to white supremacy — and selling out the interests of African-American women — when it became politically expedient to do so. This betrayal of trust opened a rift between black and white feminists that persists to this day.

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