Citylab: The segregation of our everyday lives

Citylab, August 10, 2018: The segregation of our everyday lives

 

The study finds minority households are segregated in the ways they move about in their everyday lives. Just as minority households are isolated in where they live, they are also isolated in the neighborhoods they travel to and visit. This is the case even though residents of poor minority neighborhoods travel just as widely across cities as other groups. Ultimately, race plays a bigger role than income or class in the ways we are segregated in living and moving about our cities.
For one, people of all classes, races and ethnicities travel similarly throughout the city. On average, people visited roughly 15 neighborhoods within their city’s boundaries and 18 neighborhoods across its broader commuting zone. Residents of poor neighborhoods visited only slightly fewer neighborhoods compared to those from more affluent areas. Regardless of their economic status, residents of black neighborhoods traveled to the greatest number of neighborhoods.
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