gentrification

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Study: Before COVID-19 and the protests, most of the nation was struggling, not booming

COVID-19 exposed deep economic and social fault lines nationwide. It also underscored what was already going on before it: While a small number of cities were booming, most were not. In a new report on gentrification and disinvestment, covering data from 2012 through 2017, the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) found that gentrification of once …

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Gentrification: A mixed bag in historic Richmond, Virginia, neighborhood

The primarily African American Jackson Ward neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia, has been swiftly gentrified. While some historical aspects have been forgotten, other areas have seen promising improvements. Overall, the changes to this community have been a mixed bag as some community members have benefited from the changes to home wealth, while others have been forced out.

The Washington Post: Yes, you can gentrify a neighborhood without pushing out poor people

An OpEd in the Washington Post by NCRC CEO Jesse Van Tol, April 8, 2019: Yes, you can gentrify a neighborhood without pushing out poor people When rich people move in, they often displace residents. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Neighborhoods have been developing and changing since the dawn of civilization, but …

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Washington D.G.: the District of Gentrification

This essay is part of a series that accompanies NCRC’s 2019 study on gentrification and cultural displacement. The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of NCRC. Gentrification is a policy-driven process that begins with targeting low-income, urban communities for discrimination and neglect and ends with “improvements” …

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