About NCRC

The National Community Reinvestment Coalition and its grassroots member organizations create opportunities for people to build wealth. We work with community leaders, policymakers and financial institutions to champion fairness and end discrimination in lending, housing and business.

NCRC was formed in 1990 by national, regional and local organizations to increase the flow of private capital into traditionally underserved communities. NCRC has grown into an association of more than 600 community-based organizations that promote access to basic banking services, affordable housing, entrepreneurship, job creation and vibrant communities for America’s working families.

Our members include community reinvestment organizations; community development corporations; local and state government agencies; faith-based institutions; community organizing and civil rights groups; minority and women-owned business associations, as well as local and social service providers from across the nation.

We provide agenda-setting research, training, insight and advocacy on behalf of members; we renovate and build affordable homes for low- and moderate-income families; we provide counseling to home buyers and owners and business-building expertise to entrepreneurs; we train and support housing counselors nationwide; we test, monitor and challenge discrimination in financial services and housing; and we convene and facilitate dialog between financial institutions and community networks to increase lending, investments and philanthropy in neighborhoods that need it.

NCRC represents its members before Congress, federal regulatory agencies and the press. NCRC routinely testifies before Congress, and meets with the leadership of banking and financial regulatory agencies. NCRC frequently provides expert commentary for national, regional and local media, and our research and policy papers are routinely cited by journalists, economists and scholars focused on banking, housing, urban renewal, rural development and civil rights.

Our Impact Last Year

NCRC Impact

Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

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