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Working Together for Social Change Through Community Partnerships

June 21, 2:00 pm EDT - 3:30 pm EDT

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Historically, nonprofit organizations have sought out relationships with external entities such as large financial institutions and other entities outside of the community they serve. These valuable relationships enable major programs and affordable housing developments that would not have been possible without the joint effort. However, when it comes to outreach and increasing the organization’s value in the community, often it’s the relationships inside of the community that make all of the difference. These inside stakeholders including faith-based entities, police and fire, fraternal organizations and small business understand community dynamics and have gained the trust of residents. During this training, we will discuss cultivating relationships with grassroots organizations and nontraditional partners to increase program effectiveness. We will discuss how these entities work and communicate within our community then learn how to develop community-wide initiatives that foster true change in our service areas. We will learn about communicating and working with these stakeholders and also explore the mutual benefits of collaborations. Discuss how to develop strategies for attracting and vetting potential partnerships in your community

You will learn:

  • How to cultivate relationships with grassroots organizations and nontraditional partners to increase program effectiveness.
  • How to develop community-wide initiatives that foster change.
  • How to communicate and work with nontraditional stakeholders and the mutual benefits of such collaboration.
  • Strategies for attracting and vetting potential partnerships in your community.

If you have any questions feel free to contact training@ncrc.org

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Details

Date:
June 21
Time:
2:00 pm EDT - 3:30 pm EDT
Event Categories:
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Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

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