Home Mortgage and Small Business Lending in Baltimore and Surrounding Areas


Home Mortgage and Small Business Lending in Baltimore and Surrounding Areas
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This report, Home Mortgage and Small Business Lending in Baltimore and Surrounding Areas, details lenders’ abandonment of neighborhoods in Baltimore based upon the race of members of those neighborhoods and the preferences of lenders for white borrowers and majority white neighborhoods. Using maps, statistical analyses, and public data, NCRC presents an alarming picture of Baltimore. 

Key findings of the report:

· There are very different patterns of lending in Baltimore City and the surrounding counties, with disinvestment in most of the city and affluence in the suburbs.

· In Baltimore City, race matters most in mortgage lending. Lending is greater in neighborhoods with larger white than African American populations, and there are tremendous disparities in home lending for African American and white residents.

· In the surrounding suburban counties, economic factors are the most useful in predicting home purchase lending activity.

· It is very difficult for borrowers of any income to be approved for mortgage loans in Baltimore City, where low- to moderate-income (LMI) census tracts are the majority. An LMI applicant is more likely to receive a mortgage loan in wealthier neighborhoods in Baltimore County.

Geo-coding provided by Texas A&M University GeoServices

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Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

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