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NCRC Member Profile: Newcap, Inc.

NCRC’s membership includes more than 600 community-focused organizations in 44 states. Here’s an introduction to one of them, Newcap Inc., in Oconto, Wisconsin, from Newcap CEO & President Cheryl Detrick.

Tell us about the organization’s mission/focus area.

Newcap’s mission for over 50 years has been to move people from poverty to opportunities and economic security, while enhancing community development. Through our many programs, Newcap works to support and advocate for those that we serve. We seek a high quality of life for each of our clients that starts with a whole family approach.

Describe a current challenge in your community and how your organization is addressing this.

Affordable housing is a challenge in all of the counties that we serve. Newcap is working with multiple municipalities on housing development in our service area. The second challenge is employment and training. People who are low- to moderate-income cannot access training programs that will increase their employability and higher paying jobs, therefore keeping them in a cycle of lack of resources.

Have you collaborated, or would you like to collaborate with other organizations to successfully achieve a goal?

Yes, we have and we would like to continue to build new collaborations. We currently have numerous partnerships in our communities, the state, and nationally with our community action partnership, but we are always looking to increase partnerships to be able to make a larger impact.

Why did you decide to join NCRC?

It was recommended by the National Community Action Partnership and we registered for the 2022 Just Economy Conference. We recognize the efforts that NCRC has in leadership, community development and equity that align with our work.

Please share a success story or memorable moment from your work. 

Newcap Inc. spearheaded the development effort to bring Trolley Station Terrace to life. Newcap was founded in 1965 as a Wisconsin nonprofit corporation and as part of the establishment of the community action network under President Johnson’s first salvo on the War on Poverty. Newcap has the largest physical footprint of any community action agency in Wisconsin, fully operating in 10 counties. 

Newcap Inc. assembled Crown Court Properties Ltd. as co-developer; McGann Construction Inc. as general contractor; Dimension IV Madison Design Group as project architect; and Lutheran Social Services as the property manager. Completed in August 2021, Trolly Station Terrace features a single, three-story elevator services residential building, located on 2.4 acres of land with one-, two- and three-bedroom units. Unit amenities include standard kitchen appliances, in-unit washer and dryer, a patio or balcony, and forced-air HVAC. Community amenities include a community room, computer lab, reading room, storage units, off-street parking, and on-site management.

With its 38 low-income housing tax credit units and seven market rate units, Trolley Station Terrace addresses a critical demand for housing, as evidenced by how quickly these units were leased. In fact, a majority of the units were leased a month before the official December 1, 2021 move-in date.

Connect with Newcap on Twitter, FacebookLinked In and Instagram.

Cheryl Detrick is the CEO & President of Newcap, Inc.

Photo courtesy of Newcap. Pictured is Paul Van Handle, who leads Newcap’s Homeless Outreach efforts. (January, 2021)

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Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

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