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Disaster Preparedness & Recovery Counseling

September 28, 10:00 am EDT - September 29, 3:00 pm EDT

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The coronavirus pandemic has impacted our communities like no other disaster in our history. Housing counseling agencies have dealt with major obstacles in helping consumers obtain and maintain housing through the economic shutdown and recovery.

How do you begin to prepare for a natural disaster in the midst of this current pandemic? What are the steps to take after a disaster occurs? Where can you seek help for the residents you serve? These are all questions, among many others, that are being asked during this pandemic and hurricane season, which will all be addressed in this informative and engaging two-day virtual training.

You will learn:

  •  How to access and utilize various disaster-related resources.
  •  How to help manage expectations, mitigate further loss and serve as a valuable resource to persons and communities directly or indirectly impacted by disasters.
  •  How to understand the role housing counselors play in preparing their agency for disaster.
  •  How to maximize post disaster opportunities to increase your services offered.
  •  How to work with community stakeholders in preparing for and responding to disasters in our communities.
  •  How to strengthen your community by helping residents become prepared for other natural disasters while still maintaining “COVID Smart” practices.

 

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Details

Start:
September 28, 10:00 am EDT
End:
September 29, 3:00 pm EDT
Event Category:
Website:
https://training.ncrc.org/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?Site=NCRC&WebCode=EventDetail&evt_key=72723a8a-6d7f-4336-a7c3-fa3e8935e2f7

Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

Complete the form to download the full report: