Jason Richardson

Director, Research & Evaluation
jrichardson@ncrc.org  202-464-2722
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Jason Richardson is the Director of Research and Evaluation for NCRC. He is a geographer who has done extensive research on mortgage finance and its impact on people and communities. Prior to working in research he was a mortgage broker and a banker, assisting with home purchases and working with businesses to set up deposit and credit accounts.

Prior to coming to NCRC he was a researcher with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and spent over two years documenting and meeting with banks to discuss their investment in minority communities. In this capacity he developed new and powerful methods of identifying minority clusters at the neighborhood level that are often ignored by mainstream bank and non-bank lenders.  Additionally, he has lectured and produced reports on discriminatory labor practices and procurement policies.

At NCRC Jason helps establish a research agenda that serves member organizations.  The research team at NCRC serves internal customers such as membership and organizing, and develops tools to expand existing membership. Jason also determines strategic research goals based on emergent technology and thinking on the role of banks and lending in our communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

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