In memoriam: Lottie Lee Davis

On Friday, September 18, 2020, NCRC and the city of Wilmington, Delaware, lost a champion for social justice and equality through the untimely death of Pastor Lottie Lee Davis of Be Ready Jesus is Coming Church. Pastor Lottie, who collaborated with NCRC on a variety of community development, healthcare and workforce development projects in Wilmington, died in a car crash. She was 62.

Pastor Lottie was a friend and co-laborer of the gospel, who I came to know some years ago in a meeting in the office of the mayor when we teamed up to fight to get funds released for our respective communities. Over the years, I had come to not only know her but to greatly respect her as an urban minister and member of our community reinvestment team. Not only did Pastor Lottie preach the gospel of Jesus Christ, but she also led her church and her community to practically apply the gospel, to bring change in their lives and the community through The Be Ready Community Development Corporation, an NCRC member organization. 

Over the years, Lottie developed numerous housing projects but the ones dearest to her heart were the Westside Park Revitalization of Rodney Street, Connell and Father Tucker Parks, Lazarus House and Esther’s Place Transitional Housing. Her most recent project, known as Solomon’s Court, is a mixed-use, 18-unit affordable housing project for persons with disabilities, with commercial space situated on the Westside of Wilmington. Pastor Lottie was the driving force behind the efforts to obtain funding for the project and fought hard to overcome zoning and remediation obstacles to keep the project moving forward because its vision had been given to her by the Lord.

Pastor Lottie’s leadership and dedication to the wellbeing for others was well recognized and acknowledged. Among the many awards she received were • Delaware National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials Ambassador Award- • City of Wilmington Proclamation for work in Housing for people with Disabilities • DHSS Award for work as Chair of the Housing and Civil Rights Committee of the State Council for Persons with Disabilities • Certificate of Appreciation from the Wilmington Housing Authority for Outstanding work with the Housing Choice Voucher Program Outreach Program. • Governor’s Excellence Award for development and implementation of the State Rental Assistance Program.  Lottie was also scheduled to receive an award from the Women’s Business Center Past and Present Committees, Boards, Commissions and Councils: Leadership Positions • True Access Financial • Interfaith Community Housing of Delaware, Past President • Gateway House Supportive Housing for Formerly Homeless Men with Disabilities, President • Delaware Association of Retarded Citizens • United Cerebral Palsy • Peachtree Acres Assisted Living for Person’s with Brain Injury • State Council for Persons with Disabilities’ Housing and Civil Rights Committee • Delaware Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials • Governor’s Commission on Community Based Alternatives for Persons with Disabilities • Delaware Inter-agency Council for the Chronically Homeless • Delaware Homeless Planning Council • Multiplex Tenant Council Business Incubator, • Westside Grows Together Executive Committee • Westside Friends of the Park • New Castle County Housing Advisory Board, Special Needs Housing Committee Chair.

We extend our deepest sympathy to her family, to Be Ready Church, and to her friends and colleagues.

Reverend Terrence Keeling is the CEO and Chairman of Central Baptist CDC.

Photo courtesy of Reverend Keeling.

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Redlining and Neighborhood Health

Before the pandemic devastated minority communities, banks and government officials starved them of capital.

Lower-income and minority neighborhoods that were intentionally cut off from lending and investment decades ago today suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty, but from lower life expectancy and higher prevalence of chronic diseases that are risk factors for poor outcomes from COVID-19, a new study shows.

The new study, from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) with researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health and the University of Richmond’s Digital Scholarship Lab, compared 1930’s maps of government-sanctioned lending discrimination zones with current census and public health data.

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Redlining, the HOLC Maps and Segregation
  • Segregation, Public Health and COVID-19
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion and Policy Recommendations
  • Citations
  • Appendix

Complete the form to download the full report: